#94–But not forgotten . . .

Since January 10, when The Crossings Guide to Oregon’s Coastal Spans came out, my first book Crossings: McCullough’s Coastal Bridges has been on the back burner. My focus has been on the second book, and it’s kept me busy, busy.

This new book takes up my time, just like a new kid in the family.

This new book takes up my time, just like a new kid in the family.

I’ve sent out emails announcing the book is out with PR info to many of the venues that carry Crossings and to those folks who had expressed an interest in the book. I’ve sent comp copies to those who helped with the book and newspaper reviewers. I’ve mailed or delivered books as far north as Tillamook, as far south as Crescent City, California, and in the valley all over Eugene and to Powell’s and the Oregon Historical Society in Portland. I’ve even put together a new presentation and given it to one group in town. And as soon as I acquire a few more photos, I’ll have the PowerPoint version ready.  It’s a totally different presentation. So with my whole life consumed by this new book, it’s no wonder that Crossings has been pushed to the background.

That changed this week.

My first born has been seriously neglected by me.

My first born has been seriously neglected by me.

When Powell’s wanted 10 copies of the Guide, they also ordered one Crossings. They hadn’t forgotten. And neither had four other venues.

Mon Ami, a popular

gourmet deli and antique shop in Florence, surprised me when owner Cindy wanted three more Crossings as well as four of the Guide. I only expected to sell the Guide. This is a charming shop, and I love having my books there.

Great views for whale watching at the Cape Perpetua Visitor Center.

Great views for whale watching at the Cape Perpetua Visitor Center.

Paula, my contact at the Visitor Center at Cape Perpetua, wanted six more copies of Crossings and not even one of the new book. It was such a surprise I thought it might be a mistake that they actually wanted the new book. But, no, it was Crossings they wanted.

The Visitor Center at Cape Perpetua has a gift and book shop, displays of coastal flora and fauna,  a theater showing informative videos, and a great ocean view.

The Visitor Center at Cape Perpetua has a gift and book shop, displays of coastal flora and fauna, and a theater showing informative videos, as well as the great ocean view.

Paula assured me that in the future, they will be ordering the new one, but only after a certain amount of paperwork and figuring new budgets. After all, I’m dealing with the federal government here. Cape Perpetua is part of the Siuslaw National Forest.

My books on display at Mari's Books.

My books on display at Mari’s Books.

Mary & Mari at Mari's Books in Yachats.

Mary & Mari at Mari’s Books in Yachats.

In Yachats, Mary and Mari, at Mari’s Books wanted three more Crossings as well as five more of the Guide. I was very surprised to hear from them, since I had just delivered five more of the Guide four days earlier. Mary said, “I had no idea it would be so popular!” Music to my ears! This is a favorite spot for booklovers. No wonder, the owners make each visit a delight.

The Historic Alsea Bay Bridge Interpretive Center in Waldport at the southern end of the new Alsea Bay Bridge.

The Historic Alsea Bay Bridge Interpretive Center in Waldport at the southern end of the new Alsea Bay Bridge.

The sign on the wall is next to the historic bridge's picture.

The sign on the wall is next to the historic bridge’s picture.

And in Waldport, I was surprised that Crossings is selling better than the Guide at the Historic Alsea Bay Bridge Interpretive Center. I figured the new one would out sell the old one––just because it’s new. Of all the venues on the coast, this is where I expect both books to do well.

IMG_1741

And it’s not just because Ann, who has been on top of things there for years, keeps them front and center on the counter. It’s mainly because the Interpretive Center is like a museum dedicated to the Oregon Coast bridges and their designer Conde B. McCullough. Yes, there is an emphasis on both the new and old Alsea Bay bridges. It should not be a surprise to anyone that this is one of my favorite places on the coast.

So even with a new kid in the family, Crossings has not been forgotten.

Advertisements

About crossingsauthor

Freelance writer/editor and author of Crossings: McCullough's Coastal Bridges, The Crossings Guide to Oregon's Coastal Spans, and Around Florence. Spent 22 years teaching 1st and 2nd grades and 21 years as editor/staff writer with Oregon Coast and Northwest Travel magazines.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to #94–But not forgotten . . .

  1. Evelyn says:

    No surprise to me; it’s such a wonderful book! I loaned my copy to my next-door neighbor a couple of weeks ago and he said it’s probably the finest book he’s seen on the coastal bridges. I keep both your books on my bedside table. Seems there’s always something I want to re-read or doublecheck. Thank you for all your hard work, Judy. 🙂

Comments are closed.